Vampire-to-Donor Disease Risks

(This exchange was originally posted to the wretched Yahoo! Group on the 29th and 30th of January, 2005.)

Message #9290, from Diaboluslupus:

A lot of vampire sites seem to focus on the risks of donor-to-vampire diesase transmission, but very little (if anything) seems to be have been written or considered at the risks to a donor from direct cut-to-mouth feeding. I’ve made some inquires about this, and although most STD do NOT pass easily thru saliva, there are a few that are high risk.

The always-present spectre of HIV/AIDS. — The risk to the donor may actually be greater then to the vampire because of the direct pathway to the blood stream — whereas the mouth and digestive tract have enzymes that can destroy the AIDS virus.

Hepatitis A virus — Not technically spread by saliva, it is actually spread by human waste from an infected person. So wash your hands before handing your donor. Hep A doesn’t (generally) have any long-term effects, and once you get it, you can’t get it again. GOOD NEWS — Vaccine available — from your doctor — also OTC from Ralph’s Pharmacies.

Hepatitis B virus — This is a risk to both donor and vampire as it spreads sexually, via bodily fluids, etc. Hep B is much more nasty, and can impair liver function. GOOD NEWS — Vaccine available — from your doctor — also OTC from Ralph’s Pharamcies.

Hepatitis C virus — A real nasty one, no vaccine, can cause liver failure. Transmission can occur when body fluids pass from an infected person into a non-infected person — also it is rarely transmitted by sex. The most common vector for Hep C is “dirty works” — never re-use a needle, scapal, or blade.

These are probably the worst. There are some fairly obscure diseases that can pass via saliva such as ebola, and many common but minor dieases can also pass (flu, cold, mono, and general infections).

My own conclusion is that donors should get Hep B vaccinations, and Hep A just to be safe, and/or ask partners to get tested or vaccinated for Hep A and B.

Many pharmacies provide Hep A and B vaccinations for about $150 each (three shots at $50 each). Free clinics, STD clinics, etc., generally offer free vaccinations, but it may involve an entire day spent waiting. Not all insurance plans will cover Hep B because it’s considered a “lifestyle disease”.

The above info is not by any means complete; if anyone has any background in the medical field, disease vectors, etc., and can add or correct any info please feel free to speak up.


Message #9291, from David Johansson:

In my quest for this similar information, I have met more than a few people who always bring up one often overlooked danger about blood drinking.

Tetanus.

Since it is not prominent in our society anymore people don’t worry about it. Though now we don’t have mandatory tetanus shots like they did up to high school, it is very important to be aware. You are supposed to have a booster of vaccine at least every 10 years. Perhaps even sooner if you are at serious risk.

Anyone can carry Tetanus; however Tetanus typically is not passed on person-to-person contact. There has been lots of warning that the drinking of blood of someone who has it in their blood stream can make one very ill.

But the thing to really be aware of is that it is a bacteria that lives usually on metal. Any cut to the skin with metal can be a possible way to infect one with the Tetanus bacteria. Deep wounds, burns and wounds infected with saliva are what usually are at risk. So once again this is something to be aware of!

If you are going to do ANY form of blood drinking blood play or such, make sure you and your partner have up-to-date tetanus shots.

Even though a rare thing these days, it is something that we as a group are much more at risk of due to particular “peculiarities”. >grin<


Message #9294, from Diaboluslupus:

Good point.

But I seem to recall that the “rusty nail gives tetanus” is really a myth, because the actually common path of transmission was generally from metal on farms (nails, barb wire, tools) that had been in contact with infected animal blood and waste.

http://www.nfid.org/pdf/factsheets/tetanusadult.pdf
“Tetanus bacteria are present worldwide and are commonly found in soil, dust and manure.”

It’s considered to be a rare disease in the US. But anyone traveling to SE Asia, Eastern Europe, or Latin America — especially in rural areas — would be at higher risk.

Seems like it would be prudent NOT to engage in blood play with a vampire or donor who has recently come back from third world areas or less-developed rural parts of Europe.


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The purpose of this forum is to create a safe and anonymous route of communication between those in California who actively identify themselves with the “vampiric” communities. This includes, but is not limited to, persons who participate in bloodletting, blood-drinking, blood rituals, pranic or psi feeding, S&M based bloodplay, occult practices, and more. Blood fetishists, vampires, donors, SO’s, and those who identify with the Family are also welcome to join.

We promote exchanges on safe practices and methodry relating to feeding, philosophy, community concerns, support, events, and general discussion. The discussion is not moderated. Frequent social gatherings.

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More info later.

See my website, Sangi’s Corner, for more about me.

Sanguinarius E. Sanguinarius – who has written posts on Sanguinarius.org for Real Vampires.


About Sanguinarius E. Sanguinarius

I’m the founder/creator/page slave of Sanguinarius.org. I’m in my early-to-mid 40s. I have 2 special kitties and a good man. More info later. See my website, Sangi’s Corner, for more about me.
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